Archives for March 2018

For Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month: Learning to Cope with a Mesothelioma Diagnosis as a Parent/Grandparent

Finding out you’ve been diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma, or peritoneal mesothelioma can come as a shock at any stage of life, but especially when you’re a parent or grandparent.

You probably want nothing more than the reassurance that you’re going to be there to care for and interact with the precious children in your life for years to come. It’s important to consider the emotional trauma that can result from your mesothelioma diagnosis. Taking steps to deal with your apprehensions and fears is a vital aspect of your treatment.

Your Emotional State Can Impact Your Overall Well-Being

The physical side effects of mesothelioma can actually be exacerbated when you ignore your emotional state. But if you find effective outlets for common feelings associated with a diagnosis, you may enhance your lifestyle. There are a number of different options you could try to process your emotions in a healthy way.


Develop a Support Network

Finding a local support group or getting involved in one-on-one therapy sessions with a counselor who’s experienced at helping cancer patients cope could prove highly beneficial for you. There is strength in numbers.

Talking to a group of other cancer patients who can sympathize with your feelings is often a huge relief.

Hearing ways they were able to effectively cope with their diagnosis can be empowering. Honestly expressing your frustrations and fears in a non-threatening, accepting environment can provide a much-needed release of pent-up emotions.

Consider Encouraging Loved Ones to Seek Support

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, your family and friends will undoubtedly be facing emotional battles of their own. You can let them know that you’re in favor of them joining a support group for loved ones of cancer patients if they feel led to do so.

Your children, grandchildren, spouse, or other family members probably want to stay as positive and strong around you as possible, so they may suppress many of their negative emotions.

But it’s normal for them to feel overwhelmed during this difficult time as well. Finding others who are experiencing or have experienced similar circumstances can be a big morale booster for them.

Learning to Live One Day at a Time

One of the biggest struggles those diagnosed with mesothelioma often face is uncertainty. You may be uncertain about your treatment options, the symptoms of your condition, your prospects for the future, and the toll it’s all going to take on your family. You may not feel like you have the time or energy to be the kind of parent or grandparent you want to be. These feelings are completely normal.

Learning to take life one day at a time, be good to yourself, and not feel guilty for anything beyond your control can help both you and your family to cope.

If you or a loved one are suffering from a chronic illness with a high mortality rate, remember your biggest challenge is always you. Keeping some of the above in mind is by no means an all-encompassing solution to coping, but it could be a good start.

For the month of March and in honor of Colorectal Awareness Month, please say a prayer for those living and/or affected by mesothelioma related cancers. <3

The Importance of Dinner Time With Your Kids? Washington Post

I was doing a bit of research for further content on the blog this morning; and I found something that was too good and too important not to share with YOU. =)

Actually…this (of course) refers to grandchildren too! So, keep that in mind. <3

This post is short and (hopefully sweet), lol…However, wanted to post the below snippets from the article itself.

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In most industrialized countries, families don’t farm together, play musical instruments or stitch quilts on the porch. So dinner is the most reliable way for families to connect and find out what’s going on with each other.

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In a survey American teens were asked when they were most likely to talk with their parents: dinner was their top answer.

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There are also associations between regular family dinners and good behaviors, not just the absence of bad ones. In a New Zealand study, a higher frequency of family meals was strongly associated with positive moods in adolescents.

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In our family, I always remember the warm fuzzy feeling I got whenever we (all) sat down to a meal…(usually dinner time). =) <3

So, what does The Washington Post have to say about the magical moments of mealtime?

Click The Link Below

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Article Written By: Anne Fishel

The Most Important Thing You Can Do With Your Kids ~~ Eat Dinner With Them

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Anne Fishel is a co-founder of The Family Dinner Project, a professor at Harvard Medical School and the author of Home for Dinner

Rainy-Day Activities With the Grandkids

Grand Parenting Advice and Tips for Indoor Activities

The sun may be shining today, but rest assured there will be days when the raindrops come down so hard and so fast that spending the day outdoors isn’t an option.

Thankfully, there are still plenty of ways to keep your grandkids engaged even when you’re stuck inside.

Cooking

Cooking is an intergenerational pastime that allows you to bond with your grandchildren while passing down cherished family recipes. But the kitchen is one of the most dangerous rooms in the home for a child. The risks of burns, food poisoning, and other injuries is high.

However, many of these can be mitigated with a little foresight. The definition of a kid-friendly kitchen won’t be the same for each child and can vary with age. HomeAdvisor offers a host of valuable information including links on how to eliminate eliminate common kitchen dangers and tips on burn prevention.

Science Made Fun

You don’t have to have a degree in biology to instill a love of science in your grandchildren. You likely have plenty of supplies at your fingertips to do a little hands-on science learning—no experience required. A few of the most interesting experiments include constructing a fizzy balloon inflator, building a potato or lemon clock, and making your own electromagnet. EarthScienceJr.com is an excellent resource with many easy-to-follow lesson plans, including how to make your own glass of lava.


Always keep safety equipment, including a fire extinguisher and safety goggles, on hand and open a window if you’ll be working with anything that emits unpleasant or dangerous fumes.

A Little Hobby Goes a Long Way

There’s a good chance that your own children—your grandchildren’s parents—have fallen into a routine that, unfortunately, doesn’t include time for hobbies. But, mounting evidence suggests that exposure to recreational activities has significant benefits. Psychology Today notes that these include stress management and self-concept formation, each of which are valuable skills for children to develop.

Use these rainy days to help your grandchildren identify activities they are not only good at but enjoy as well. Younger kids might delight in coloring, which can transform into a love of art, photography, or graphic design. Older children may find interest in a more hands-on hobby like woodworking, which teaches the concept of mathematics and engineering.

Children involved with hobbies that require the use of hand or power tools should always wear safety gear and only have access to the tools under the supervision of a responsible adult. Keep the garage or workroom locked unless it’s occupied to prevent wandering and curiosity from becoming a trip to the ER.

Take a Look at a Book

If mobility is an issue or you aren’t comfortable working in the kitchen or garage with younger kids, you can always snuggle up together on the couch with a book. Reading is a fundamental skill that is not only learned in the classroom.

Children learn to read by watching how adults follow along with words and listening to rhythmic tones and inflections while being read to. The Washington Post explains that reading out loud is also an opportunity to get silly and enjoy a good laugh together.

Don’t be discouraged if your grandchildren can’t sit through a book or interrupt to ask questions. Part of the journey toward literacy involves taking time to process information and reading deeper into the story by probing for details that aren’t in the text.

No matter the activity, hobbies such as cooking, crafting, and learning about the way the world works are not only fun, they lay a foundation upon which your grandchildren can grow their passions.

Who knows, you might be nurturing the next Mario Batali or Marie Curie. Even more importantly, time spent bonding with your grandchildren creates memories that will last a lifetime.